Several times, using his skill of disguise, dressed in a prison guards uniform used two ladders transported across the yard and when a spot light hit him he yelled out, "It's ok" and continued his escape without incident. Later, Sutton attributed the famous quote of "That's Where The Money Is" to an inventive reporter embellishing a story. It was surmised that he had stolen around $ 2,000,000 over his career. Later on accountants would use this theory to focus on high cost areas as a target for savings. It was called the "Willie Sutton Rule" following "where the money is"

The Birth of the United States Post Office In early colonial times most correspondence took place between the colonists and England. The King’s authorities would read and scour all of the information and mail that was being sent. Correspondence between the colonies depended on trusted friends, merchants, or friendly Native Americans. Around 1639 Richard Fairbanks’ Tavern in Boston, Massachusetts was designated as the official repository of mail by The General Court of Massachusetts (appointed by the King). Using taverns as mail drops was common practice in England, and the colonists adopted this practice as well. Local authorities designated by town