The degree to which robots will take our jobs will largely depend on whether robots can effectively substitute or augment our work. There are various scenarios at play here that will determine whether robots will take over our jobs: 1. We allow robots to voluntarily substitute our jobs because we are no longer prepared to do the work ourselves. In fact, we are happy for robots to take over our jobs. Examples include military service, car production and manufacturing, space exploration, underwater exploration, duct cleaning, crime fighting, fixing oil spills, investigating hazardous environments, and commercialized agriculture. 2. Robots can be

Every day thousands of workers find and lose jobs as businesses grow or close. Each new job found represents income for food, shelter, and education. Each job lost may represent giving up some or all of these basic necessities. When a global company decides to move its business operations overseas – a process called “off-shoring” – one country’s or worker’s loss of jobs may translate into another country’s or worker’s gain. The growing phenomenon known as off-shoring presents both benefits and challenges for the developed and developing world. What is Off-shoring? Imagine that the computer you are using has suddenly