So you think you want to establish a career where you get to work with reptiles and amphibians. If that is the case, this article is for you. Why did I write an article about getting what seems to be an easy-to-obtain job? First, there are a lot of people who contact zoos, museums, and websites asking just that question. While there are some pamphlets available that briefly address the question (ASIH, no date; SSAR, 1985), there are few other published resources available (Barthel (2004); Sprackland and McKeown, 1995, 1997; Sprackland, 2000). There are some guides to entering the academic

Jim, a department manager you depended on highly, just announced he’s changing careers to become a zoologist. You are desperate to fill his position and are doing everything you can to ensure you bring in someone equally talented (although perhaps with a slightly lower love of animals). You’ve sifted through a stack of resumes higher than the Burj Dubai. You had someone do a quick phone screen to eliminate obvious “oops” candidates. You cleared your schedule (that was a painful chore), and you are ready to being interviewing. In walks Candidate A. You shake hands, introduce yourself (wondering silently what

Career assessments and tests help you explore who you. Career books and web sites give you a glimpse of the world of work. Free career information is available on web sites. Some writers have written facts for children and teens. We would like to share some information with you. These web sites use graphics, multimedia presentation, activities, and other techniques to expand our knowledge of careers. We have written information on seventeen (17) web sites. Here are the four different types of exploring careers web sites: Curriculum General Career Information Science Career Clusters Specific Science Careers Curriculum Web Sites Curriculum